Book Review: Say What You Will by Cammie McGovern

Amy was born with cerebral palsy and can’t walk without a walker or talk without a computer voice box.  She can’t even completely control her facial expressions.  All of these things have largely alienated her from her peers.  When she decides to hire student helpers for her last year of high school, her mother is reluctant, but Amy is persistent.  She wants Matthew, a student at the school who is struggling with obsessive-compulsive disorder, to be one of her helpers.  As the two become enmeshed in each other’s lives, a deep friendship forms, and the two of them wonder if they could ever be more.

Let’s get this out of the way: Cammie McGovern’s debut is garnering comparisons to John Green and Rainbow Rowell, but this is a novel that doesn’t need those comparisons.  This one stands well enough on its own.  Comparisons like that only do it a disservice, and may actually alienate readers who might otherwise read and love it.  McGovern’s debut is smart, heartfelt, and absolutely original.  One of the best books of the year, this is a must-read for fans of contemporary YA.

Both Amy and Matthew are remarkably well-drawn characters.  Amy is smart, funny, and fiercely independence, despite the physical limitations imposed on her body.  Her realization that she’s been kept at a distance from her peers for the entirety of her schooling forces her to confront the fact that she needs to learn how to relate to people her own age, and her attempts to do so feeling achingly authentic.

Matthew’s obsessive-compulsive disorder is also sensitively written, and his personality as a kid who cares but lacks direction feels very realistic.  The two have an immense chemistry that leaps off the page, and their rapport is guaranteed to hook readers early on.  Neither character is defined by their diagnosis, and this means that the characters are full, real people.  What McGovern does so well is create real suspense between the two characters as they tentatively search out what their relationship could mean.

The normalization of each character’s disability makes this book a standout when it comes to inclusion lit.  The romance, the wit, and the excellent characterization of the book’s leads make this one a must-have for the summer.  Although the book is slightly over-plotted and some of the secondary characters could be fleshed out a bit more, these are easy nitpicks to overlook.  Buy this one.  Highly recommended.
Say What You Will by Cammie McGovern. HarperTeen: 2014. Electronic galley accepted for review via Edelweiss.
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